Category Archives: Credit Valley Conservation

CVC Seeks Nominations for Environmental Awards

When it comes to a healthy environment, Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) believes anything is possible with a little help from its friends. To honour local efforts, CVC is seeking nominations for its annual Friends of the Credit Conservation Awards. The awards program recognizes first-time projects and initiatives, as well as those that have extended over multiple years. Consideration is given to all projects that promote a healthy environment.

“For three decades it has been our privilege to honour those who have improved the health and wellbeing of our communities,” said Mike Puddister, CVC’s Deputy CAO and Director of Watershed Transformation. “The awards program is our way of recognizing those in the community who stand out for their leadership and environmental contributions.”

The Friends of the Credit Conservation Awards are given annually to people who demonstrate environmental excellence in the watershed. Nominations are open to individuals, landowners, schools, community groups, businesses and youth (25 and under) who have made a significant contribution to the local environment.

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Native Plants Bring All the Birds to the Yard

Landscaping is a source of pride for landowners. Beautiful trees, plants and flowers with bursts of vivid colour are only part of the story. The other part is the long list of welcomed visitors. Vibrant songbirds, migrating butterflies and busy bumblebees bring life and excitement to any garden. Native plants are proven to attract more welcomed wildlife, giving you a garden that’s truly buzzing.

Ontario’s local wildlife are perfectly adapted to Ontario’s native plant species. For example ruby-throated hummingbirds will eat nectar from cardinal flowers while pollinating them at the same time. When the cedar waxwing, a very beautiful bird, eats the berries from a red cedar, the germination rate is three times higher than if they didn’t pass through a bird at all. Turtlehead flower nectar contains a ‘medicine’ for bees to reduce intestinal parasites. So while bees are busy eating they are healing themselves and pollinating flowers. These examples of plant-animal symbiosis result from millennia of native plants and native wildlife evolving together in the same ecosystems. Continue reading Native Plants Bring All the Birds to the Yard