Category Archives: City of Mississauga

SPEED LIMITS LOWERED IN 77 NEIGHBOURHOODS WITH MORE TO COME

The City has been lowering speed limits in Mississauga neighbourhoods to make residential streets safer for everyone using them. Speed is a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal collisions according to the Ontario Traffic Council. Lower speeds are a proven way to reduce the severity of injuries in the event of a collision.

To date, speed limits have been lowered from 50 km/h to 40 km/h in 77 neighbourhoods. More than 130 School Zones have also been lowered from 40 km/h to 30 km/h. Work will continue in 2022 to lower speed limits in even more neighbourhoods across the city. 

These changes, which are part of the City’s Neighbourhood Area Speed Limit Project, help to advance the City’s commitment to Vision Zero. Mississauga is working to prevent fatalities and serious injuries due to collisions on our roadways.

Lower speed limits in neighbourhoods 

When a speed limit is lowered to 40 km/h, new speed limit signs are installed on streets at the entrances and exits to all neighbourhoods. The new speed limits take effect when the new speed limit signs are installed. The 40 km/h speed limit applies for the entire neighbourhood unless otherwise indicated by signage (for example, when it becomes 30 km/h in a School Zone.)

Lower speed limits in School Zones 

School Zone speed limits in residential neighbourhoods are being lowered from 40 km/h to 30 km/h. In addition, Community Safety Zones are designated in all School Zones. In 2021, more than 110 new Community Safety Zones were created. Within a Community Safety Zone, fines increase.

Find out what neighbourhoods have been completed 

Watch for new speed limit signs in your neighbourhood. To check what neighbourhoods have been completed, check the mapon mississauga.ca/roadsafety.

You can search by address or focus on an area of the city. Green shading shows neighbourhoods which have been completed. The orange areas show those where the speed limit changes will be coming soon.

Additional speed reduction measures 

Other speed reduction measures completed by the City in 2021 include:

·        13 approved traffic calming projects

·        200 passive traffic calming measures

·        600+ speed studies conducted

·        22 Automated Speed Enforcement Cameras

·        50 Slow Streets implemented

·        3,000 Slow Down lawn signs delivered to residents

To learn more about road safety in Mississauga, visit mississauga.ca/roadsafety.

Slow Streets have Rolled Out in Mississauga Neighbourhoods

With COVID-19 public health protocols still in place this summer, the City has decided to move forward with expanding its Slow Streets initiative, piloted as Quiet Streets in 2020, in all City wards. Slow Streets have rolled out in neighbourhoods throughout Mississauga to give residents ample space to safely move around their neighbourhood. They will be in place until the end of October 2021, to allow time to prepare for the winter season. 

Slow Streets are a temporary traffic calming measure that involve installing road barricades and signage on neighbourhood streets. Slow Streets are intended to provide additional space for pedestrians and cyclists to move around their neighbourhood while safely maintaining physical distancing, following COVID-19 public health recommendations. Slow Streets also reduce speeding and limit traffic to local vehicles. Slow Streets will remain accessible to car traffic and two-way travel. Posted speed limits will remain the same.

Slow Streets direct drivers to slow down and share the road with other road users. By implementing Slow Streets, those walking, running, biking and using mobility devices can comfortably use the road while being able to physical distance.

Temporary barricades and signs will be installed at main vehicle entry points. This installation signals to drivers to slow down, avoid passing and take extra care if they live in the area and are navigating the road. The barricades will also allow for easy movement of essential emergency service vehicles as well as waste and road maintenance vehicles. Specific layouts will vary somewhat depending on characteristics such as road width and parking usage on each roadway.

Slow Streets are not intended for multi-lane major collector or arterial roadways or with roads that have MiWay routes. 

There are no changes to services such as waste collection. Please put your green, blue and grey carts at the curb following your regular schedule.

Learn more about the City’s road safety initiatives, visit mississauga.ca/services-and-programs/transportation-and-streets/road-safety/slow-streets/

Budget Committee Meeting Scheduled for June 21, 2021

Budget Committee meeting is scheduled for June 21, 2021, at 9:30 a.m. where staff will report on an updated financial position for 2021 and budget outlook for 2022.

In April, staff provided an update on the impacts of COVID-19 as well as projections regarding the City of Mississauga’s Budget and Business Plan for future years.

The budget and business planning process enables the City to efficiently provide residents and businesses with municipal services, projects and programs. The City’s budget allocates the funding and resources needed to deliver services and maintain the infrastructure that residents and businesses depend on, while meeting the City’s short and long-term operational and strategic goals.

Stream the meeting day of or catch up on previous Budget Committee meetings.

Learn more about the City’s Budget and Business Plan at mississauga.ca/budget.

Mississauga Official Plan Review Meetings to Discuss Housing, Growth, Transportation and Environment

The City is hosting three virtual community meetings to discuss key directions of Mississauga’s Official Plan Review. Housing, growth, transportation and the environment will be the focus in this phase of public engagement.

Mississauga is reviewing its current Official Plan, which guides growth, to ensure it reflects the changing needs, opportunities and aspirations of the city. Since launching the Official Plan Review in June 2019, the City has conducted ongoing public consultation. Having reviewed the community feedback to date, this current phase of engagement focuses on confirming policy directions for environment, transportation and growth.  Engagement for housing options will explore ideas from the community.

What & When:

Virtual community meetings to discuss our future city:

·        What are the priorities for the environment and transportation?

Tuesday, June 15, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.  

·        Where will major growth go?

Thursday, June 17, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

·        How can we increase housing choices in our neighbourhoods? 

Wednesday, June 23, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Who:

·        Mississauga residents and property owners

·        Business owners and employees

·        Members of Council and City staff

How:

To participate:

·        Register here or call 311. Registered participants will receive meeting instructions and background materials. If you are unable to attend, the meetings will be recorded and can be viewed following the sessions.

·        Provide feedback or ask a question on the project engagement site.

To prepare for the meetings:

·        Official Plan Review: Visit the project engagement site to review the research briefs, theme summaries and project engagement to date

·        Housing: Help shape the conversation by taking the survey and sharing your ideas.Visit the Increasing Housing Choices in Neighbourhoods for more information

·        Transportation: For more information, see related studies including Changing Lanes and the Transportation Master Plan

·        Environment: For more information, see related studies including the Climate Change Action Plan  

Background:

The City’s Official Plan policies address important parts of city-building that affect how the city grows, including transportation, housing, culture and heritage, the environment and the economy.

The Official Plan addresses:

  • where housing, industry, offices, shops and roads should go
  • which services and amenities (e.g., parks, schools, transit) are needed and where they will be located
  • what parts of the city will be the focus for growth and what it will look like e.g., heights and densities
  • ways to enhance economic development and job growth

The City launched the Official Plan Review at a Special Council meeting held on June 10, 2019. For more information and to sign up for email updates, visit the public engagement page.

Proposed Ninth Line Improvements Will Support Future Travel Demand for Everyone

The City of Mississauga is proposing transportation improvements for Ninth Line from Eglinton Avenue West to Derry Road West. In a corporate report presented at General Committee today, City staff identified opportunities to support future transportation needs for all road users – pedestrians, cyclists, transit users and drivers. Improvements will also support the City’sShaping Ninth Line study, that looks at transforming the last remaining greenfield into a sustainable, transit-supportive, connected and distinct neighbourhood.

“Great transportation infrastructure is a key foundation to an evolving city,” said Mayor Bonnie Crombie. “That’s why it’s important that we continue to invest in transportation and make necessary changes to get people moving throughout Mississauga. Whether they walk, cycle, take transit or drive, residents want options and alternatives to support their preferred mode of transportation.”

The City completed an Environmental Assessment Study – as required under the Ontario Environmental Assessment Act – to identify issues, opportunities, solutions and design concepts. Residents and stakeholders were involved in multiple engagement sessions to provide input and recommendations.

“I am excited for the future of Ninth Line. These changes will make getting around more accessible and safer for everyone in the community, and is much needed as our city continues growing,” said Sue McFadden, Ward 10 Councillor. “It’s another important step in transforming the Ninth Line lands – including future additions of a new sports park and community centre – and to see its potential as a major transportation artery in Ward 10. Thanks to all residents who engaged with us on this important project.”

Significant proposed changes will include:

·       Separated boulevard cycle tracks and sidewalks

·       Road widening from two to four lanes

·       New signalized intersections

·       Crossrides at all signalized intersections and intersections without signals

·       Upgraded and new transit stops

·       Posted speed limit to decrease from 70 km/h to 60 km/h

·       Intersections designed in compliance with Accessibility for Ontario with Disabilities Act

·       Enhanced streetscaping features

“As Mississauga experiences more traffic on its roadways, the City continues to find ways to improve traffic flow and how people move around,” said Geoff Wright, Commissioner, Transportation and Works. “Improvements will greatly benefit everyone as we provide more transportation options on Ninth Line. This includes better active transportation and transit infrastructure, and increasing capacity for road users to accommodate existing and future demand. Prioritizing safe travel options for all road users will also help advance our goal of achieving Vision Zero. Transportation improvements like this, along with those for Dundas Connects, are all part of the City’s Transportation Master Plan for future mobility.”

The proposed Ninth Line improvements will now go to Council on June 16, 2021 for final approval. To learn more, read the corporate report: https://pub-mississauga.escribemeetings.com/filestream.ashx?DocumentId=13018

Learn more about Shaping Ninth Line at mississauga.ca/ninthline.