Spend More? Spend Less? Have your say on the City Budget

Mississauga’s online budget allocator has been updated for 2016 budgeting and is available starting today at mississauga.ca/budget.

Results from the allocator received by November 9 will be shared with Budget Committee November 23. The results will help inform Budget Committee’s review of the 2016 proposed Business Plan & Budget.

“The budget allocator is a great way for residents to learn about the cost of City services, and tell us about their priorities,” says Jeff Jackson, Director of Finance and Treasurer. “It helps get people thinking and involved in their City’s service planning and budgeting process.” Continue reading Spend More? Spend Less? Have your say on the City Budget

Fire Prevention Week – Free Community Open Houses

Can you ‘Hear the Beep Where you Sleep?’ During National Fire Prevention Week, October 4 to 10, Mississauga Fire and Emergency Services (MFES) wants to remind you that this sound can save your life.

During Fire Prevention Week, MFES will be in the community and opening fire stations throughout the city to help educate residents on the importance of fire prevention and safety.

According to MFES, most fires in Mississauga occur in residential homes, so having an escape plan, knowing the sound of your alarms and having both fire and carbon monoxide detectors in place can save lives. Continue reading Fire Prevention Week – Free Community Open Houses

Native Plants Bring All the Birds to the Yard

Landscaping is a source of pride for landowners. Beautiful trees, plants and flowers with bursts of vivid colour are only part of the story. The other part is the long list of welcomed visitors. Vibrant songbirds, migrating butterflies and busy bumblebees bring life and excitement to any garden. Native plants are proven to attract more welcomed wildlife, giving you a garden that’s truly buzzing.

Ontario’s local wildlife are perfectly adapted to Ontario’s native plant species. For example ruby-throated hummingbirds will eat nectar from cardinal flowers while pollinating them at the same time. When the cedar waxwing, a very beautiful bird, eats the berries from a red cedar, the germination rate is three times higher than if they didn’t pass through a bird at all. Turtlehead flower nectar contains a ‘medicine’ for bees to reduce intestinal parasites. So while bees are busy eating they are healing themselves and pollinating flowers. These examples of plant-animal symbiosis result from millennia of native plants and native wildlife evolving together in the same ecosystems. Continue reading Native Plants Bring All the Birds to the Yard